Cozy Winter Nights Music Series coming to Clayton Center for the Arts

January 3, 2012
Contact: Cheri Compton, Director of Marketing

Cheri.Compton@claytonartscenter.com; 865.981.8263

Beginning Jan. 28, 2012 at 8 p.m., the Clayton Center for the Arts will bring an eclectic mix of performers to the Harold and Jean Lambert Recital Hall on Saturday evenings this winter.

Tickets for each concert are $10 for general admission and may be purchased by at the CCA Box Office 865-981-8590 or online at www.claytonartscenter.com

With the success of the Friday Nights Live Music Series last summer, Clayton Center Executive Director Robert Hutchens wanted to keep the same spirit of the concerts but bring an opportunity for music lovers to hear a variety of music on Saturday evenings.

“These are local or regional artists who are every bit as talented as some of the more famous artists,” he said. “We want people to come to the Clayton Center for the Arts to experience something new, a favorite genre or to get out on a dreary winter night to have a hot chocolate and hear great music.”

All concerts begin at 8 p.m. The lineup includes:

Jan. 28 – Jonathan Maness

The son of a bluegrass banjo player and a classical pianist, Maness was impressed with a desire to be proficient in many different kinds of music. He spent his high school years learning fingerpicking guitar. In college, the next logical step was to study classical music with Dr. Douglas James at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C. In between his academic pursuits, he continued to steadily improve his bluegrass chops on guitar and mandolin.

Feb. 4 – Sam Hatmaker

Hatmaker is a 13-year-old singer/songwriter who has written over 90 songs. She currently sings at American Oldies Theater in Pigeon Forge and with Bob Hamill’s Variety Show at various benefits. For the last three years, she has appeared at Dollywood in “Sha-Kon-O-Hey!” and “O Holy Night.”

Feb. 11 – Blue Mother Tupelo

Rising up from the dusty Delta lowlands and muddy bayou banks of Indianola, Miss., through the bluffs of Memphis to the mountains of East Tennessee, comes the unique Southern Soul sound of Blue Mother Tupelo. Blue Mother Tupelo is a Knoxville favorite.

Feb. 18 – Ensemble Swing Time Band

A favorite from last summer’s Friday Nights Live Music Series, the Ensemble Swing Time is a 16-piece big band from Knoxville that specializes in classic big band swing and performs original arrangements made famous by Glenn Miller, Harry James, the Dorsey Brothers and other great bands from the Swing Era.

Feb. 25 – Mountain Soul

The Clayton Center is excited to have another Knoxville favorite, Mountain Soul, who taps deep Appalachian roots. Bluegrass tones underscore a modern Americana sound. Traditional-based harmonies embellish homegrown stories of love, loss and coal in a post-TVA South.

March 3 – Sneaky Pete Rizzo

For 33 years, Texas A&M University Professor Emeritus Dr. Peter Rizzo has had an alter ego, his “wild twin brother” Sneaky Pete, who can be seen around local clubs with his trademark fedora and guitar.

March 17 – Knoxville Area Dulcimer Club

The Knoxville Area Dulcimer Club is an educational, non-profit organization dedicated to teaching, sharing and enjoying the playing of Appalachian and hammered dulcimers.

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The Clayton Center for the Arts, located on the Maryville College campus and constructed through a unique partnership between the College and the cities of Maryville and Alcoa, is East Tennessee’s newest venue for arts and entertainment.

The 1,200-seat Ronald and Lynda Nutt Theatre features dance, theatre, concerts, lectures and other events. The 250-seat Harold and Jean Lambert Recital Hall hosts a wide variety of musicians and performers. The 200-seat Haslam Family Flexible Theatre is capable of supporting theatrical performances from amateur and professional companies.

Three art galleries display collections and works of art from Appalachia and beyond.