“Paul Robeson” play performed for Black History Month

Contact: Cheri Compton, Director of Marketing
Clayton Center for the Arts
865.981.8263; cheri.compton@claytonartscenter.com

The play, “Paul Robeson” by Phillip Hayes Dean will be presented for one performance only in the Harold and Jean Lambert Recital Hall. General Admission tickets are $10 for Adults and $5 for students and may be purchased at the Clayton Center for the Arts Box Office by calling 865-981-8590 or at www.claytonartscenter.com

Paul Robeson was a world famous scholar, athlete, actor, singer and civil rights activist. He was among the first African Americans at Rutgers University. He excelled in sports and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors. While studying for his law degree, he was discovered as an actor. He went on to star in All God’s Chillun Got Wings, Show Boat, Porgy and Bess and Othello, where his amazing voice was showcased. He traveled the world and spoke several languages but became known and criticized for his political beliefs. Paul Robeson died one of the most versatile African Americans of all time on Jan. 23, 1976.

Horace E. Smith, accomplished regional theatre actor, commands the stage as Paul Robeson. Smith, a graduate of Free-Hardeman University has appeared in Ain’t Misbehavin, Five Guys Named Moe, Hello Dolly and Crazy for You. Smith says “The Paul Robeson play is more than just another show for me. It allows me to give homage to a person I admire and appreciate.”

The Clayton Center for the Arts, located on the Maryville College campus and constructed through a unique partnership between the College and the cities of Maryville and Alcoa, is East Tennessee’s newest venue for arts and entertainment.

The 1,200-seat Ronald and Lynda Nutt Theatre features dance, theatre, concerts, lectures and other events. The 250-seat Harold and Jean Lambert Recital Hall hosts a wide variety of musicians and performers. The 200-seat Haslam Family Flexible Theatre is capable of supporting theatrical performances from amateur and professional companies.

Three art galleries display collections and works of art from Appalachia and beyond.