Art by Paula Campbell on display at Clayton Center

Aug. 13, 2015

Photographer Paula Campbell will display her work in the Clayton Center for the Arts’ Blackberry Farm Gallery and William “Ed” Harmon Gallery from Aug. 26 until Sept. 25.

An opening reception, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the galleries on Fri., Aug. 28 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m.

The exhibit, titled “Seeing in Black-and-White,” includes 30 black-and-white gelatin silver prints comprising three different series: Fabric, Urban Terrain and Dream Memories. Each series relies on traditional black-and-white photography to explore a contemporary theme, Campbell said.

“Fabric is a recent study of the subtleties of draped or folded fabric. Close-up photography and darkroom enlargements emphasize the texture and tonality of the different materials,” Campbell said. “Urban Terrain is a series of urban photographs which document the struggle for co-existence between nature and man-made structures in the Southern cities of Savannah and Key West. Efforts to control nature and decorate urban spaces are simultaneously comical and futile.

“Finally, Dream Memories is an earlier series of pinhole photographs of collaged fragments of fashion images, magazine ads and photos,” Campbell continued. “While the ‘re-contextualizing’ of image scraps from fashion locates the subject in the surreal world of fashion – the individual photographs break from the commercial intent and reference a personal narrative.”

Campbell received her MFA in studio art with an emphasis in photography from Eastern Michigan University in 2001. After moving to the Knoxville area, she designed and taught photography courses at Pellissippi State Community College and for the continuing education program at the University of Tennessee. Since 2011, Campbell has been an adjunct instructor at Maryville College, teaching both traditional black-and-white and digital photography. 

Her work has been included in exhibitions in Soho Photo Gallery, New York City; Society for Contemporary Photography, Kansas City; Ford Gallery, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Mich.; Detroit Street Gallery, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Holter Museum of Art, Helena, Mont.; and The DeFoor Centre, Atlanta, Ga.

The exhibit is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.

By Chloe Kennedy, Assistant Director of Communications


Maryville College is ideally situated in Maryville, Tenn., between the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Knoxville, the state's third largest city. Founded in 1819, it is the 12th oldest institution of higher learning in the South and maintains an affiliation with the Presbyterian Church (USA). Known for offering its students a rigorous and highly personal experience that includes an undergraduate research requirement, Maryville College is a nationally ranked institution of higher learning that successfully joins the liberal arts and professional preparation. Total enrollment for the fall 2016 semester is 1,198.