Maryville College again ranks among U.S. News’ “best”

Aug. 27, 2003

For the ninth time in 10 years, Maryville College has made the list.

U.S. News & World Report posted its annual college rankings at midnight Aug. 22, and magazine issues detailing the information are on sale now.

Maryville was ranked in three categories for the magazine’s 2004 guidebook. It was ranked No. 3 in the “Best Comprehensive Colleges – Bachelor’s” category for southern colleges and universities. It was the only Tennessee institution listed in the category’s top 10. Berea College of Kentucky ranked first.

Maryville College was named a “Best Value” among its peers (ranked No. 8), and also was included in a listing of like schools in the South with the highest graduation rates (ranked No. 7).

“ At this time of year, we at Maryville College always eagerly await the start of a new academic year, the arrival of the new freshman class and the publication of U.S. News & World Report’s college rankings,” said Dr. Gerald W. Gibson, Maryville College president. “We are pleased, once again, to be named among the best colleges in the South.”

The news came as the College prepared for what may be a record-number of students on campus. Preliminary totals for the freshman class have hovered around 290; transfer and international students are expected to add another 90 to the student body.

The College’s first appearance in U.S. News & World Report’s top-10 list occurred in 1994, when the College debuted at No. 7 for the 1995 guidebook. Since then, Maryville College has appeared in the annual list ranking best colleges and universities, but also has also been included in categories that recognize best value and commitment to undergraduate teaching.

“ I always say that these types of rankings aren’t based on exact science and therefore shouldn’t be used to measure progress from one year to the next, but the fact that the College has stayed in the top 10 of this category for so many consecutive years speaks to the quality of education and total learning experience offered here at Maryville,” the president said. “Internally, we know our students receive a top-notch education, but U.S. News’ rankings always help spread that message, externally, to prospective students and their parents.”

Gibson took the opportunity to congratulate and thank faculty and staff members on the recognition.

“ Certainly, their daily efforts to transform Maryville College from a good college into a great college are evident in these rankings,” he said.

U.S. News arbiters use 16 categories of data to measure academic quality. These include reputation, retention of students, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, alumni giving and graduation rate performance (the difference between the proportion of students expected to graduate and the proportion who actually do).

The “best values” rankings are based on three variables: ratio of quality to price, percentage of all undergraduates receiving grants meeting financial need during the 2002-2003 year, and average discount.

U.S. News & World Report, a national magazine, annually judges colleges and universities for their academic excellence and publishes rankings in its weekly magazine and newsstand book “America’s Best Colleges.” Currently, college and university rankings for 2004 can be seen at www.usnews.com. A complete listing of the rankings and some articles from the newsstand book is included in the Sept. 1 issue of U.S. News.

In addition to faculty and staff, Gibson recognized alumni, parents, friends, corporations, foundations and other donors for helping make Maryville College a “best value.”

“ Without the support of the extended Maryville College, we would not be able to provide the large amount of scholarships and financial aid to deserving students that we do.”

Fall semester classes began Aug. 27.